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Will the Tampa Bay Buccaneers chain of command be a problem?

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May 4, 2012; Tampa, FL, USA;  Tampa Bay Buccaneers general manager Mark Dominik and head coach Greg Schiano talk during rookie mini camp at One Buc.   Mandatory Credit: Kim Klement-US PRESSWIRE
May 4, 2012; Tampa, FL, USA; Tampa Bay Buccaneers general manager Mark Dominik and head coach Greg Schiano talk during rookie mini camp at One Buc. Mandatory Credit: Kim Klement-US PRESSWIRE

Greg Schiano. Mark Dominik. Bill Sheridan. Butch Davis. Jimmy Raye. Mike Sullivan. Those are the six main decision makers with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Or at least, that's my guess - because it's entirely unclear who does what, who is in charge of what and how decisions get made at One Buc Place. I've talked about this before, but organizational clarity is important, and the Bucs have a whole lot of organizational obscurity. That's what the guys over at Football Outsiders thought too, in outlining their chapter on the Bucs in their almanac:

The first half of this essay was written just before the Combine, when Greg Schiano cobbled together his band of unlikely coaching misfits. There's Butch Davis, whose job title is carefully crafted so he can double dip on his North Carolina University severance. There's Jimmy Raye, last seen mumbling into a headset and losing a power struggle to Alex Smith in San Francisco. There's Bill Sheridan, who was so terrible with the Giants that he was fired before season's end in 2010 by the most patient organization in the NFL. This is one garbled mess of a coaching staff, with guys like Davis and Raye holding vague titles that all but guarantee chain-of-command questions.

The second half is more optimistic, because the Bucs had a solid draft, made wise free agent acquisitions, and appear to have a decent young nucleus in place. The coaching staff may have some hiccups, but the Bucs will be better than they were in December of 2011. To get any worse, they would have to have all the bones from their bodies removed and live on as jellyfish people.

It's a fair complaint, and it's certainly a concern. Unfortunately, we can't see behind the scenes - so we don't know how big of a problem this is. But if the Bucs start cutting down on the decision-makers or reports of internal strife start coming out, we'll probably know the cause of all of that.